Fig. 60. American and Contintental methods of measuring the stocking leg.
FIG. 60—American and Continental method of measuring
length of leg.
STOCKINGS

Method of measuring the size of foot of Full-Fashioned Hosiery:

Place a ruler so that it lies straight from tip of toe linking or looping, to uppermost fashion mark in heel. This is usually 1" above the bottom of the heel. The size of foot is the distance from tip of toe to back of heel, made to the nearest ½". Fig. 58.

The method of measuring the length of a Full-Fashioned Hose is shown in Fig. 60.

The stocking is laid on a flat surface, without stretch, and a ruler is placed so that it is parallel to the front of the stocking and touches the curve at the ankle, the length being the distance from the bottom of the heel, lower end of heel narrowing, to the top of the stocking.

The foot size of Seamless Hosiery is determined by laying the stocking out flat, placing the ruler at the tip of the toe along a straight line just touching the toe-gore and extending to the bottom of the heel-gore. The size is the measurement from the tip of the toe to the back of the heel, to nearest ½" (see Fig. 59).

The length of Seamless Hosiery is determined by laying the stocking out flat without tension, and the ruler is placed parallel to the front of the stocking, touching the heel-gore and the curve at the ankle. The length is the distance from the bottom of the heel to the top of the stocking, as indicated on line shown, in Fig. 60.

GRADES OF INSPECTION

First, it must be accepted that in the production of hosiery, certain Silk, Rayon, Nylon, or Lisle defects cannot be avoided. The importance of these defects in stockings must be judged in relation to:-

1. Their size, and their position in the stocking.

2. The colour and weight of the stocking.

Certain grades of inspection have been set up for goods, these being:-

         First quality.

         Irregulars.

         Seconds.

        Thirds.

These four grades cover silk variations (unevenness), and also include Rayon, Nylon, and Lisle defects